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Big Brothers Big Sisters of St. Lucie County     |   home
                                                  

In 1992 and 1993, some 959 boys and girls, ranging in age from 10 through 16, entered an experiment. Approximately half were matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister, while others were assigned to a waiting list, or control group. On average, the matched children met with their Bigs about three times a month for an average of one year.
And the results? Researchers from Public/Private Ventures* found that 18 months later, the Little Brothers and Little Sisters were:
46% less likely to begin using illegal drugs 27% less likely to begin using alcohol 52% less likely to skip school 37% less likely to skip class 1/3rd less likely to hit someone, and getting along better with their families More confident of their performance in schoolwork Getting along better with their families
Just think about it: Young adolescents saying 'no' to drugs and alcohol, improving their school attendance, getting along better with their families and peers--all because they had Big Brothers and Big Sisters. "These dramatic findings are very good news, particularly at a time when many people contend that 'nothing works' in reaching teenagers," said Gary Walker, president of P/PV. "This program suggests a strategy the country can build on to make a difference, especially for youth in single-parent families."
*P/PV, based in Philadelphia, is a national research organization with more than 18 years of experience in studying child development and social service issues.

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